News & Updates – January 15, 2014; Issue 194

Proportion of Opioid Treatment Programs Offering On-Site Testing For HIV and STIs Declines

technology“A survey of opioid treatment programs finds that the proportion offering on-site testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) declined substantially between 2000 and 2011, despite guidelines recommending routine opt-out HIV testing in all health care settings, according to a study appearing in the December 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

From 2000 to 2011, the absolute number of programs offering testing for HIV, STIs, and the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) increased but the percentage offering on-site testing for HIV declined by 18 percent and for STIs by 13 percent. There was no change for HCV testing. More than 75 percent of public programs offered on-site testing for each infection, with no change over time.

Declines were most pronounced in for-profit programs.”

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-12-proportion-opioid-treatment-on-site-hiv.html

Source: MedicalExpress.com – December 24, 2013

Dr. Jana Burson Blog: Who Should NOT Be in Medication-Assisted Therapy with Either Methadone or Buprenorphine?

“I spend much time and effort explaining how medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction works for many addicts. It occurred to me that I should explain who isn’t a good candidate for such treatment.

I enthusiastically support medication-assisted treatment (MAT) of opioid addiction, but no treatment works for everyone. MAT doesn’t work for every opioid addict.” Dr. Burson offer ten reasons a patient may not be suitable for MAT including:

  • The patient isn’t addicted to opioids.
  • The patient takes opioids for pain, but has never developed the disease of addiction.
  • The opioid addict presenting for treatment has been physically dependent for less than one year.
  • The opioid addict has the ability to go to a prolonged inpatient residential treatment program for his addiction.

All this is to say that the goal of entering an opioid treatment program isn’t necessarily to
get off the treatment medication.

So if a patient seeks to enter methadone treatment but also expresses a desire to be off buprenorphine or methadone within weeks to months, I tell them their expectations aren’t realistic. These medications don’t work like that. If the patient wants to get off all medications quickly, they need referral to an inpatient program. This way, patients can’t later say they were mislead, and they feel like they have liquid handcuffs, chained forever to methadone, with its many regulations for treatment.’

http://janaburson.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/who-should-not-be-in-medication-assisted-therapy-with-either-methadone-or-buprenorphine/

Source: Jana Burson – MD  – January 5, 2014

New Mexico Jail Methadone Program Shows Mixed Results

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jail cropped“A recent study conducted by the University of New Mexico found that inmates in the methadone maintenance program, which provides a daily dose of methadone to inmates already enrolled in a community-based methadone program, spent almost 40 days longer out of jail than their opiate-addicted counterparts not enrolled in a methadone program. That amounts to per-inmate savings to taxpayers of almost $2,700, according to the study, as taxpayers shell out around $69 to house an inmate per day.

The study published in early December, however, contains another finding that erases the savings: Inmates enrolled in the methadone program tended to stay in jail 36 days longer than other inmates. It’s unclear what causes methadone inmates to stay longer, though the program’s directors and others have a couple guesses – that methadone-receiving inmates are more comfortable in jail than those addicted to heroin, and that inmates getting methadone tend to prefer serving their full sentences and leaving jail without probation.”

http://www.abqjournal.com/331644/news/methadone-program-shows-mixed-results.html

Source:  ABQJournal.com – January 6, 2014

Beating the Poppy Seed Defense: New Test Can Distinguish Heroin Use from Seed Ingestion

“Heroin is one of the most widely used illegal drugs in the world, but drug testing has long been challenged by the difficulty in separating results of illicit heroin users from those who have innocently eaten poppy seeds containing a natural opiate. Research in Drug Testing and Analysis explores a new test which may present a solution to this so-called ‘poppy seed defense.’

The team sought to identify an acetylated derivative which is known to be present in street heroin, but would not be found in either poppy seeds or medicines containing opiates. The authors identified a unique glucuronide metabolite (designated ‘ATM4G’) which could be used as a marker of street heroin use. A high frequency for the presence of ATM4G in urine strongly suggests that detection of this metabolite may offer an important advance in workplace drug testing and forensic toxicology, providing a potential solution to the poppy seed defense.

‘This research report addresses a longstanding analytical problem in forensic toxicology and workplace drug testing, by identifying a urinary marker that differentiates street heroin users from those whom have ingested morphine present in poppy seeds’ said Dr. Andrew Kicman, from the Department of Forensic and Analytical Science at King’s College, London.”

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-01/w-btp010714.php

Source:  Eurekalert.org – January 7, 2014

Blog: What Health Care Reform Could Mean for Drug Policy and Mass Incarceration

healthcare reform 2“What does the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mean for drug policy?. A new issue brief – From Handcuffs to Healthcare — published by the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) and the American Civil Liberties Union(ACLU) outlines how the ACA could help our country end the war on drugs and move toward a health-based approach to drug policy

This paper is intended as a starting framework for criminal justice and drug policy advocates to navigate the ACA, and to take advantage of the conceptual and practical opportunities it offers shifting the conversation and the landscape.

Part One of this paper describes some of the major provisions of the ACA relevant to our work: the health insurance requirement; the places many people will buy insurance, called health exchanges; Medicaid expansion; insurance coverage requirements for substance use and mental health disorders; and opportunities for improved models of coordinated care.

Part Two of this paper outlines a series of practical recommendations, including program and policy examples and suggested action steps, across three broad categories:

  • Ensuring access to care for people most likely to be steered into the criminal justice system under the current framework
  • Leveraging the ACA to reduce incarceration and criminal justice involvement
  •  Moving from a criminalization-based drug policy approach to one rooted in health

The Brief can be accessed at: http://www.drugpolicy.org/sites/default/files/Healthcare_Not_Handcuffs_12.17.pdf

Source: HuffingtonPost.com - December 3, 2013 and DrugPolicy.org – December 2013

Monitoring the Future Results Released

In mid-December, The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) announced the results of its 2013 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey. The survey, conducted earlier in the year by scientists at the University of Michigan, tracks annual drug abuse trends of eighth, 10th, and 12th-grade students. NIDA is a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

MTF is one of three major survey instruments the Department of Health and Human Services uses to monitor the nation’s substance abuse patterns among teens.

This year’s announcement focused on attitudes about and prevalence of marijuana use, as well as abuse of synthetic drugs, prescription medications, and tobacco.

Prescription Medications – There was mixed news regarding abuse of prescription medications. The survey shows continued abuse of Adderall, commonly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, with 7.4 percent of seniors reporting taking it for non-medical reasons in the past year. However, only 2.3 percent of seniors report abuse of Ritalin, another ADHD medication. Abuse of the pain reliever Vicodin has shown a marked decrease in the last 10 years, now measured at 5.3 percent for high school seniors, compared to 10.5 percent in 2003.

Heroin – For cocaine and heroin, while there was no significant change from the 2012 rates, there continues to be a gradual decline in use, with both drugs at historic lows in all three grades. The 2013 rate for high school seniors for past year cocaine use is 2.6 percent, compared to a peak of 6.2 percent in 1999. Similarly, the reported use of heroin by 12th-graders is 0.6 percent this year, compared to a peak of 1.5 percent in 2000.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/monitoring-future

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse – December 16, 2013

Severe Mental Illness Tied to Higher Rates of Substance Use

People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a higher risk for substance use, especially cigarette smoking, and protective factors usually associated with lower rates of substance use do not exist in severe mental illness, according to a new study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Estimates based on past studies suggest that people diagnosed with mood or anxiety disorders are about twice as likely as the general population to also suffer from a substance use disorder. Statistics from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health indicate close to 8.4 million adults in the United States have both a mental and substance use disorder.  However, only 7.9 percent of people receive treatment for both conditions, and 53.7 percent receive no treatment at all, the statistics indicate.

Studies exploring the link between substance use disorders and other mental illnesses have typically not included people with severe psychotic illnesses.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/news-releases/2014/01/severe-mental-illness-tied-to-higher-rates-substance-use

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse – January 3, 2014

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