New Report Shows Treatment Admissions for Abuse of Prescription Pain Relievers Have Risen 430 Percent From 1999-2009

A new report shows that while the overall rate of substance abuse treatment admissions among those aged 12 and older in the U.S. has remained nearly the same from 1999 to 2009, there has been a dramatic rise (430 percent) in the rate of treatment admissions for the abuse of prescription pain relievers during this period. The report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows that the rate of treatment admissions primarily linked to these drugs rose from 10 per 100,000 in the population in 1999 to 53 per 100,000 population in 2009.

The rise in treatment admissions related to the abuse of prescription drug pain relievers occurred in every region of the country, but was highest in the states of Maine, Vermont, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Arkansas, Rhode Island, and West Virginia.

“While some aspects of substance abuse treatment admissions have changed – meeting the overall need remains an essential public health priority,” said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde. “The increasing numbers of people entering treatment for prescription drug abuse is the latest indicator of the severity of the problem.”

The report, “Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) 1999 to 2009, State Admissions to Substance Abuse Treatment Services” is based on the report of thousands of substance abuse treatment facilities throughout the nation and Puerto Rico. TEDS is an administrative data system providing descriptive information about the national flow of admissions to specialty providers of substance abuse treatment.

The 177 page report can be accessed at: http://atforum.com/addiction-resources/documents/TEDSState2010.pdf

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration – December 8, 2011

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